Sushi Revolution

Address: 240 Ferndale Road, SW9 8FR

Website: https://www.sushirevolution.co.uk/

We arrived at this restaurant on the day it opened – wearing masks and very early. It is pretty bare, some tables, counters with high chairs and a bar. We were mistakenly given a large table for the three of us, as speech in our face masks was clearly difficult to discern. We remained there for the whole meal as the alternative was to sit in a line at a counter, which is very awkward, even if very Japanese.

The menu description is “taking on Japanese classics with a rebellious twist”. I assume they mean Padron peppers with a yuzu miso, or miso soup with truffle oil. Plenty to try and we did our best to sample as much as possible. There are gluten free and vegan options.

The choice is snacks and nibbles, Sushi, Nigiri and Sashimi, “Revolution” – think panko popcorn shrimp, Salads, various Maki, and if you really can’t decide, then choose one of the four sharing plates. We have given a description, but can’t really describe the taste of each – they are right about innovation and we will return, less hungry, to savour all the different flavours.

We had Yellowtail Nikkei Sashimi with yuzu truffle oil, Karaage Roll chicken with avocado, yuzu koshu mayo – Crispy Drago tempura prawn with avocado, spicy mayo, teriyaki, and sesame. Don’t ask us to choose each one was a delight.

Then there was the Aubergine Nigiri (yummy!) and California Uramaki prawn, with cucumber, avocado, miso aioli, and tobiko (flying fish roe, small and perfectly formed but not as much of a zing).

For dessert we had a Mango Passion Fruit Mochi and a Coconut Mochi – we preferred the Mango one but both were delicious.

We washed it all down with a couple of bottles of Asahi beer, Blushing Bride Session APA, and a couple of glasses of Inzolia Borgo Selene, Sicilian white wine (no picture)

Choosing to browse the menu rather than eating the shared plate does increase the cost which was …… £91.14 including 12.5% service for three people and all our drinks. The most expensive sharing plate with 28 pieces was really enough for three and cost £35.00, but you can get away with £15 per person for an interesting plate that is probably sufficient for the less greedy. Our view is to return and we will sit at the counter if there are only two of us but if there are more than two and you are not prepared for the Wimbledon head turning experience then specifically ask for a table.

Snacks in lockdown – a guide

My work team have introduced lots of interesting activities each week to take the place of those informal contacts we used to have with each other. Some are competitive like the best character made out of a toilet roll, but some are just good fun. They contributed to the Hot Cross Buns review and now we are contributing to “snacks”. These mostly come in plastic packaging and increase our girth. They are the things we eat while on zoom with the microphone and video turned off to help us with those really boring interludes when we are staring at an excel sheet and there is no colleague around who offers to make a cup of tea. We rated them on “Texture (1 = rubbish, 10 = perfect), Flavour (1 = horrible, 10 = perfect) and Quantity (1 = nowhere near enough, 10 = perfect) – always try to be scientific about these things but we didn’t make everyone eat everything…… but here goes.

Sweet

Nakd Cocoa Orange was clearly a hot favourite with a 10 on flavour but some disagreement aobut whether it was enough and whether they had the texture quite right and we wanted more of it! The Oreos were defiitely enough – you always get more than one but were a bit down on flavour and texture. I suppose we should have drilled down a bit more to discover how they were eaten – halved and licked, with music (a la Heston) or the custard cream method which just means biting them whole. Cadbury Darkmilk Giant Buttons got high scores on tecture and flavour but although they were very creamy and indulgent, there were quite a lot for a quick snack. Nakd Bakewell great on flavour but down a bit on quantity and texture (we really need a control comparison with a Mr Kipling). Last in this group is the old fashioned Curly Wurly. These used to be a long lasting sweet but were judged as much too small these days although the flavour was perfect and the texture just a little down on a top score.

Savoury

First in the savouries and gettig top marks for flavour and texture was the Nature Valley Sweet n Salty Peanut bar. This though was judged the worst for the quantity but maybe a good thing based on the number of calories. Pickled Onion Monster Munch – a children’s favourite – was certainly enough in terms of quantity even if it fell down on the texture and flavour. Several treats were gluten free but these ones were picked out of the mix – RW Garcia Lentil with Turmeric crackers. They scored very highly on all three ratings but are pricey. Kettle’s Salt and Pepper Crisps were high on flavour and texture but lower on quantity – those bags have plenty of air in them.

Finally a new kid on the block is the M&S Marmite butter featured in the top photo. This is a brilliant innovation in the field of snacks. It is efficient requiring just a single knife for both Marmite and butter so reduces washing up. It also prevents the yellow flecks in the Marmite, for those of us trying to save the planet one washed knife at a time. Banished is the problem of the Marmite pooling on the toast as it slides over the butter. Thank you M&S – Marmite butter and toast is the EatinBrixton favourite. My team were less enthusiastic but I am hoping to convert them but that means that M&S need to keep supplying it.

In the meantime I drew plucky North Macedonia in the Euro 2020 which means I will be back snacking after the game with the Netherlands.

Only Food and Courses

Address: Pop Brixton

Booking via the website: https://www.onlyfoodandcourses.co.uk/

This is a brand new, top of the range, eatery in Pop Brixton that opened only weeks ago. They have all day dining -12.00 to 5.00 pm and then a supper club in the evening (8.00 pm to 10.00 pm, Thurs-Sat), when they serve a fixed six course tasting menu. They will take walk-ins during the day but not for the evening, but it is best to book any time as there is limited seating. We visited for a long Sunday lunch with friends in May.

They describe their food as ” From Caf’ clichés, to dinner party classics, and cocktails raided from your mum’s drinks cabinet, this is the best of British nostalgia”. A great description of the deconstructed classics from the 70s and 80s.

We made it simple and ordered one of everything on the lunchtime menu – four starters, four mains and two desserts. The titles of the dishes give nothing away – Bloody Mary’, ‘Ham, Egg & Chips’, Prawn Cocktail and ……..a surprise for you, as we can’t remember. From the pictures you can see that they are splendid renditions, with just enough to interest everyone and it was just too hard to decide a favourite. The Bloody Mary consists of a granita which comes with roast tomatoes and chickpea chips. Ham, egg and chips is a terrine with more chickpea chips and egg yolks. But we don’t want to spoil the fun which is wrapped up in the surprise, so here the detail stops. Even on the first two photos you will see there are “extras” – ask them to describe them in detail. You may need to take notes as we forgot as soon as they moved away from the table.

For the main course we got Smoked Short Rib Hash, Crab Scotch Egg, Lobster Doughnuts and we think it was a duck eclairs, but it was really “pretty as a picture” even on a rainy Sunday. The beef had a rich sauce, the scotch egg was runny and had crab instead of meat and the others…. well my mouth is watering just looking at them.

We were pretty full at this stage and the small plates do ramp up the charges, but we decided to complete the whole menu with the two remaining items – Lemon Meringue and Beetroot Bakewell. Again pretty as all desserts should be. The bakewell was a bit dry, but the lemon tart a sensation.

We washed it all down with several Brixton brews.

This is not a cheap meal, but it is an excellent one. We ate far too much and each plate was between £10 and £14 – so you can see that splashing out on every part of the menu increased costs considerably. These were quirky plates, pretty but also good to eat – next time we visit we will try not to be too hungry and just look at them for a bit longer before pulling them all apart. Their six course tasting menu (which we will have to try, but maybe for a special occasion) is £65.00.

Wuli Wuli – the takeaway

address: 15 Camberwell Church Street

Telephone: 020 7708 5024

https://www.wuliwulicamberwell.co.uk/

Even though you can now visit restaurants, bookings are really hard to get, so we are still relying on a takeaway or delivery each week. This is a very good Chinese restaurant in Camberwell and we recommend it, so you may not need to read to the end.

Wuli Wuli is a Chinese restaurant specialising in Sichuan meals. Think a bit spicy to very spicy. It has its own delivery service so choose that method for ordering from its website. They ring you up if they spot an error or to offer a slightly different meal. The menu is a bit overwhelming so do not order when you are too hungry as the portions are very large. The menu is long – appetizers stretch to 14 and there are seven kinds of Dim Sum even before you get to handmade dumplings and soup.

Overwhelmed by choice we chose 2 B set dinners which consist of – Chicken sweetcorn soup, portion of crispy aromatic duck, sweet and sour chicken, beef with green peppers in black bean sauce, stir fried mix vegetables and special fried rice. The picture doesn’t show the Chicken sweetcorn soup but it was deliciously spicy and the first to be devoured. None of it was greasy – surprising given the number of fired things here.

We liked it all – not always the case with takeaway food. We also had some leftover which provided lunch the following day.

The cost was £27.98 with no service fee as we ordered direct from the site. A bargain for the quality and amount of food.

Sandwich corner

A takeaway from a local outlet, eaten in Brockwell Park, has been a real treat during lockdown, even when the weather has been inclement. Some of these outlets have sprung up but may only last a little while as lockdown ends. This is a description, not a competition and we don’t know when some will stop providing an al fresco lunch – although given the hopes for better weather, perhaps they might like to continue to feed those going into the park.

We normally enter the park from the Brixton Water Lane entrance, so our reports focus on what during lockdown became “Sandwich Corner”, with some interesting new choices. Obviously, there are other options near the other entrances, especially the one in Herne Hill. You could also buy sandwiches from Sainsbury’s, or even go for an old-fashioned kebab.

The trend was led by Maremma, who worked out early on that they had to show some initiative, given the pandemic. We have liked it as a restaurant (see here and here) and, unsurprisingly, their sandwiches were excellent.

Then we went to Il Sovrano, an excellent new Italian delicatessen. The address is Tulse Hill, but it’s down at the Brixton end. Don’t get confused and head off towards West Norwood. This place deserves an entry of its own, so watch this space. But here we really wanted to have their truffled beef sandwich, which is simply stunning. Perhaps it’s too good, as on the occasion of our review they’d sold out. So we had to have a salami and mozzarella wrap instead. Still tasty.

Finally there’s Naughty Piglets. Again, a top local restaurant (see here and here) offering a takeaway option during lockdown. They transformed themselves into a Burger Bar with a range of interesting options, as well as the classics. But this wasn’t a M*******d’s. We chose a char siu pork bun with Korean mayo plus chips. Here the culture clash worked to everyone’s advantage. And maybe our appetites are shrinking, but one meal was plenty for two of us. So the cost of £12 was reasonable value.

India Week – in Lockdown

Although you can now visit outdoor restaurants it is chilly and rainy for May. So, as we head towards indoor eating, we decided to focus our weekly food on India. Or, more accurately, our interpretation of Indian cuisine based on that staple recipe, “whatever’s left in the fridge, with spices”. I hope that explains what we have here with two types of roast cabbage, plus a mixed vegetable curry. In truth, this approach became the theme of the week.

Then another vegetable curry. It might look the same as yesterday but this one had mushrooms, aurbergine, more spinach and lots of chillies. It came with a dhal, but we forgot to take a photograph.

We always cook more potatoes than we need so the remaining ones were spiced up and with added coriander and a relatively short memory it was a “bit different from yesterday. For this dish we added one of our home grown chillis (surprisingly easy to keep alive) and we also added tamerind.

Finally we had spicy lentil and tomato soup, using leftover dhal as the base with the addition of what were rapidly becoming time-expired tomatoes.

Dishoom (our inspiration this week) was wonderful but expensive, so this week’s options were a balance. Not all vegan but all vegetarian and definitely an introduction to those “layered” flavours, as they say on Great British Menu.

Dishoom – the lockdown delivery

This is Bombay comfort food but also elegant. It pays homage to the Irani cafes. There are five restaurants in London and they offer delivery from breakfast to dinner, as well as a store where you can order a marmalade mimosa and bacon naan roll kit (or the vegan version) – good for birthdays as well as lots of other cocktails in dinky bottles.

To start off our Indian week we ordered from this more upmarket restaurant which has always been advertised by friends as a great place to eat. So we gave it a try. Ours came by Deliveroo (we had no choice!). We tried a lot of dishes just to get the hang of it, and this is not a cheap restaurant so it is definitely buyer beware. They also advertise that the delivery dishes are those that can abide travel. We agreed on that – everything was in peak condition despite the lengthy delivery.

The menu comes in separate sections, but is long so order when you are not starving. There are small and larger plates, rice, bread and puddings. It is also easy to order vegetarian and vegan and there is lots of advice about the ingredients that might cause some people a problem (e.g. Black Daal contains milk). We ordered Jackfruit Biryani (with saffron’d rice with mint, coriander and sultanas), Chole (spiced chickpea curry from the Punjab), House Black Daal (a Dishoom signature dish which is cooked over 24 hours), Vegetable samosa (pea and potato spiced with cinnamon and cloves) served with a small pot of tamarind chutney, Chilli Broccoli Salad (half portion) and a plain naan. We also ordered rasmalai (milk curds with almonds, in saffron-cardamom cream) and mango lassi for dessert.

Yes you can see that we over-ordered and this was after we had filled our plates. There was nothing that we didn’t like and we were really impressed that an Indian restaurant could be so different even on a delivery. So well done.

For dessert – a rare treat – we ordered ras malai (sweet cooked cheese in sweetened milk) and a mango lassi. This is the half portion.

The following day we finished the ….. by making it into a toastie

The bill came to £51.60 which was enough food for two for at least two or three days. Will definitely order again.

The Tapas Room – cook yourself kit

Website: https://www.thetapasroom.co.uk/find-us

Phone: 020 3770 8808

When take out just isn’t giving you enough of a buzz, then swap to “cook at home” and this one, hosted on a Sunday evening, was great. It’s from The Tapas Room in Brixton Village, which is rapidly becoming a favourite of ours and, glad to say, is now open for “outside” dining. See our visit last October here. But this time a small group of us joined a Zoom call and followed the demonstration.

It was their “Dia de Pascua” menu and as well as the ingredients in tubs (ones with stickers went into the fridge), we also received lots of truffle oil, virgin olive oil and old, slightly sweet PX vinegar and three – yes three – bottles of wine. There is nothing complex about this meal. The most difficult issue was finding the Battersea restaurant to pick up the “hamper” – it is behind a Tesco Metro – when I say behind you really need to use your GPS.

If there is anything too difficult then they have already prepared it for you. We failed to take pictures of the final plates – we were too hungry and wolfed it down without a thought of where our phones were.

The mouthwatering menu begins with Lustau Puerto Fino (dry sherry) with a set of tapa – Marcona almonds, Catalan fuet (sausage), caperberries, picos (dried bread pieces) and pan con tomate. The only thing we had to do was to slice the sausage and prepare the pan con tomate – fresh grated tomatoes with garlic and seasoning on half a lightly toasted ciabatta roll. We were advised that if you leave the tomato mixture overnight then the garlic infuses and is even better. But we ate it straight away and it was fresh and delicious.

The next tapas – although quite a hefty portion – was wild mushrooms with quails eggs. You saute the mushroom mixture in olive oil and then place them on the two pieces from another toasted ciabatta roll. The quails’ eggs are a little tricky to extract from the shells, but we got good instruction from the Tapas control room. The quails’ eggs are lightly fried and go on top of the mushrooms with a drizzle of truffle oil, salt and PX (vinegar). Really tasty and easy to do.

Next came the lamb chops on peas and panceta with anchovy butter. Here we were glad of the anchovy butter. It would be easy to make it ourselves, but so much better to have it in a pot. The panceta and the finely diced shallots (again another time saver) come in one pot with the frozen peas – put them in a pan with a splash of water. Then you need to cook the lamb in a frying pan using the olive oil. It doesn’t take long – it was recommended as 2 minutes per side but that depends on how hot the pan was when you start. Too little time and the lamb will be too pink. This then needs resting for at least two minutes but five would be better. Serve the dish together with the pea mixture on the bottom and the chops artistically placed on top (as we have no photos you will have to take our word for it). Then the pièce de résistance, anchovy butter spooned onto the lamb. This was eaten with the Sabina Estate Crianza – a fruity Spanish red.

The final course was a Tarta de Santiago with cherry compot. A lovely end to the meal, as the tart (an almond cake really) was light and not too sweet and the cherry compot was tart. We ate this with our favourite wine of this meal – a not too sweet red called Libamos Dulce de Mencia. It describes the wine as flavours of redcurrants, red cherries and a mineral background – we just thought it was fantastic. We like to drink something with pudding and most are far too sweet, but this was just right.

The cost – £80 for two – was expensive, but we did get three bottles of wine, as well as the food and many of the ingredients, the truffle oil, olive oil, the PX vinegar and the salt, are stock for the cupboard. We hope they will do this again, although we note that at least three of their restaurants are now open – including Brixton, so book soon.

Spanish Week – In Lockdown

So, on to our Spanish week initiated by our takeaway from Boqueria and our recent Tapas Room home cooked meal (coming soon). We have a somewhat fixed idea of what should be on the menu, which means the dishes mimic our choices from an Andalucian restaurant. First off was a “tortilla Espagnol” using the basic recipe with fried potatoes, onions, eggs and enormous amounts of olive oil. Cooked on the stove and then the oven. Eaten warm is best, but we were hungry… it was delicious. All the ingredients are readily available from Brixton of course.

Next was an attempt at “Arroz Negra” – rice with a sprinkling of muscles and squid with a squid ink sauce. Despite its rather unappealing photo – it was good to eat. The rice needs to be like a risotto, with a bit of a bite, the main difference being that it doesn’t need constant stirring. Having a crispy bottom – the socarrat – is the objective. Beware of putting in salt too early, as the squid ink has some already. The fish came from Brixton but the squid ink was from packets acquired on a past trip to Spain. Let’s hope it’s not too long before we can restock.

Lastly, we have a chickpea, spinach and roasted pepper dish, which expands on a family favourite with the addition of more tomato and of course chestnuts. This was served with half of a patatas bravas. We were too hungry to wait for the mayonnaise-like sauce, which meant we just ate delicious roasted potatoes. They usually have packets of the ready-cooked chestnuts at Brixton Wholefoods.

Hot Cross Buns

Despite living together for many years, we have a great divide in our household. One person believes in the old ways – traditional ways – where Hot Cross Buns are only eaten on the Friday Bank Holiday before Easter – that’s why it is Good Friday. The remainder of the household believes that they are to be eaten as soon as they enter the shops and some even put away in the freezer for when you want “a little something with a cup of tea”.

This year there was a compromise mainly because we visited M&S and saw their new varieties. It was never going to be possible to try them all on one day without feeling very ill afterwards, so this is a review over a few days. The M&S varieties are shown in the main picture. The telltale sign that they can be called Hot Cross Buns is the cross on top ……. although the traditionalist thinks that all should have fruit and spice for the real McCoy……. that discussion took more than half an hour.

Your intrepid reviewers risking their waist (and their credibility) have decided to taste the lot. But there are other varieties so we included a whole research team who ventured far and wide and bought two packets of hot cross buns from – Lidl, the Co-op, Morrisons, Aldi, Sainsbury’s, Asda, M&S and Gails. We also bought some from a local bakery in Brixton. It turned out that some members of the team were nubies – never having tasted a hot cross bun before and some had tasted and didn’t like them – but read on we had a few converts.

What do you look for in a Hot Cross Bun (apart from the cross, the fruit and the spice – argument still going on with the traditionalist). It needs to smell like a hot cross bun and toast like one too. So a light toasting is required which means watching the toaster or grill very carefully. Then it needs butter or a non-dairy spread of your choice. This is important as most hot cross buns are vegan – even though M&S sells a vegan variety. All this means that it can’t be too dense, it has to be soft and airy, a shiny top (burns easily) and not too sweet (this was the key factor in decisions about which was best).

So here we go – We are starting with traditional where we had representatives from – Asda, M&S, Aldi, Morrisons, Sainsbury’s, Co-op Limited edition and a local bakery. This wasn’t a tasting based on a Latin square design (for the statisticians among you) so this is just their comparison test with A.N. Other bun. Everyone who had the M&S one liked it better than others but the Lidl one was also good especially after toasting. The Co-op one had too much fruit. No-one who had a choice chose the one from Sainsbury’s. It was described as too dry, which was also a fault of the one from the local bakery. The Asda one was OK, which is not a ringing endorsement. The Morrison’s one was too dense and didn’t have enough spice. The Aldi one was chosen by someone who isn’t keen on hot cross buns, so chose them because they were smaller (I don’t think that is a realistic endorsement).

Now we are going to take a look at the other varieties with a cross on top. The sweet ones are – M&S salted caramel and chocolate, Asda “scaramel”, M&S apple, M&S blueberry, M&S extra chocolately, Gails Candied Orange, and M&S Gluten free and Vegan. If you are going to call something by a specific name then it needs to live up to it. All managed that except the Asda salted caramel which didn’t have enough caramel. The M&S salted caramel and chocolate was unsurprisingly described as sickly – you really do need a sweet tooth. All the others got a positive vote by anyone who tasted them. The gluten free one achieved “structural integrity” so it could take butter and didn’t fall apart like many kinds of gluten free produce. The blueberry was recommended for anyone who doesn’t like raisins. The M&S extra chocolaty was described as “well balanced” – I think that was the bitterness of the chocolate so it wasn’t too sweet. The apple and blueberry really smelt of apple and blueberry when you open the packet – making them inviting.

But it doesn’t stop there – M&S expanded into non-fruity, not-at-all sweet varieties. We tried the cheese and chilli and the cheese and Marmite. You probably do need to like Marmite, but it just adds saltiness to a cheesy bun and I liked it but this was a split decision……. guess which side the traditionalist was on. If you like chili then this is just the right for a rainy lunchtime watching Bargain Hunt.

We don’t really have an overall winner to offer – if you have a sweet tooth then you will be looking forward to a happy Easter with lots to choose from. If you thought you didn’t like Hot Cross Buns then there are more varieties to try and we did have converts to the fruity-but-not-raisin varieties. If they are in the shops we do advise freezing as you may want to eat one on May Day and they will vanish from the shelves until 2022. In my view their appearance should herald the spring like the John Lewis advert announces Christmas