Kricket

Kricket01

You remember Kricket in Pop Brixton – see our review here. We liked it’s original take on tapas type Indian meals for sharing, coming from a variety of places around the Indian subcontinent. We were sad to see it go to a more permanent setting in Soho, but it has now returned to its roots. There’s a new venue, in Atlantic Road in the two arches vacated by Brindisa. Design is minimal. Stretched corrugated metal over the arched ceiling and wooden tables and chairs for two, four or a crowd. It opened only a couple of weeks ago, so is enjoying a honeymoon period where booking is a must. They fitted us in as walk-ups at 6.20, but we only had the table for an hour. Continue reading

Calcutta Street

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Address: 395 Coldharbour Ln, Brixton, London SW9 8LQ

Website: http://calcuttastreet.com/locations/brixton/

Phone: 020 7326 4200

Opening times:

Monday to Friday: 5.30pm–11pm

Saturday: Midday-11pm

Sundays & Bank Holidays: Midday–5pm

This is the Coldharbour Lane branch of this small chain – there’s just another one in Fitzrovia. The food, says the owner, Shrimoyee Chakraborty, is inspired by her mum’s cooking and the “amazing local cuisine” of Calcutta. We’ve been a couple of times in the evening and been seriously impressed by the exciting cooking on offer. It’s a particularly good replacement for what was previously yet another burger bar.

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Bombay Kitchen

Bombay_Kitchenaddress: 384 Coldharbour Lane SW9, SW9 8LF

telephone: 020 3417 7309 & 020 7733 2727

http://www.bombay-kitchen.co.uk/

We cannot now remember what this shop was before it was a restaurant. It is next door to the popular Asmara but is completely the opposite. Asmara is dark and Bombay Kitchen has all lights blazing with a glass frontage. This is not the traditional Indian in terms of décor  There is no flock wallpaper for one thing. It describes itself as contemporary and has a clean design with a small open bar and chairs and table that match – unlike many places in the heart of Brixton. There is piped music and it is Indian again unlike the musak that most of the flock wallpaper brigade provide for its clientèle.

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